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Indigenous communities: Respect for land steeped in traditions

Pace of environmental decline on Indigenous territories is slower despite mounting pressures
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Through local knowledge, management techniques and traditions passed down through generations over the millennia, Indigenous communities around the world play a vital role in protecting the Earth. At least a quarter of global land area is traditionally owned, managed, used or occupied by Indigenous Peoples.

The 2019 Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) global assessment shone a light on the contribution of Indigenous People to landscape conservation. The report shows that environmental decline, land degradation and biodiversity loss occur at a slower rate in Indigenous-managed territories, findings with implications for scientists and policymakers, highlighting the value of supportive partnerships.

In this time of COVID-19 pandemic, several communities in Indonesia and Mexico also show resilience  by practicing the communal way of life and respect for the nature, pointing out the importance of strengthening Indigenous People and Local Communities.

Listen to Let’s Talk Trees as we explore some of these connections with Rukka Sombolinggi, secretary general of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance Of The Archipelago (AMAN), Indonesia and Tania Eulalia Martinez-Cruz, an activist, researcher and a member of the Ayuuk community in Tamazulápam del Espiritu Santo, Mixe, Oaxaca, Mexico.

 

Read also:

Traditional practices and beliefs in landscape management

Our food system, is it sustainable?

Importance of Indigenous Peoples’ lands for the conservation of Intact Forest Landscapes

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This research forms part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry, which is supported by CGIAR Fund Donors.
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